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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
this week as did the number one police officer in london, the chief of scotland yard. that is just one of the ways the whole rupert murdoch scandal is getting awkward for politics and its most high-profile politicians, same goes for david cameron, also the leader of the conservative party, and the man he picked to be his communications director was arrested earlier this month. today the conservative party admitted ties to another person arrested in the scandal, advised on political matters in the run-up to the general election by a man named neil wallis. wallis was also arrested last week. in terms of the scale of the criminal behavior at hand and how much the company brass knew about it, the lithe of people we know to have been paid off to keep the story from getting any bigger now includes 700,000 pounds paid to a soccer union boss. one of the conditions of the settlement -- of the payment was confidenciality. also sienna miller got 100,000 pounds and andy gray was paid 20,000 pounds after the people's phones were hacked into, which is illegal. is it plausible that the brass at ruper
scotland yard's handling of the investigation. his assistant also resigned. stephanie gosk is following the latest developments from london for us. >> reporter: richard, in the last 24 hours, there have been two high-level resignations from scotland yard and colluding the police chief himself, sir paul stevenson, he has resigned because he hired in 2009 a former editor of "news of the world." his deputy, john yates, has resigned after he was informed that he would be suspended while an investigation into scotland yard's investigation of the scandal was being conducted. john yates is being criticized for in 2009 not continuing to pursue an investigation into the phone hacking. all of this comes while their department continues to make arrests. on sunday they arrested rebekah brooks, i high-level trusted executive of rupert murdoch. her lawyer today said that this arrest took her by surprise, that she is not -- that she says she is not guilty of any criminal wrongdoing and that they held her for nine hours yesterday without presenting her with formal allegations or with actual evidence of
over the weekend, and now the head of scotland yard and his assistant are resigning. if you're keeping score so far, there have been three high-profile resignations, ten arrests and it is not over yet. jim maceda is live in london to bring us up to speed on this. jim, good morning. >> reporter: hi there, thomas. make that four high profile resignations. just a couple of hours ago scotland yard's number two, john yates, also resigned under increasing, extraordinary, really, pressure. that on the heels on his boss's resignation last night. commissioner paul stevenson, he was the head of scotland yard. he, if you will, fell on his sword and said that he could not in good conscience continue with all the challenges to keep the peace in great britain as he and specifically his relationship with the murdock media empire became such a focus of attention. he was calling it a major distraction, which could not go on. of course among those ten arrests you mentioned, the latest high profile arrest was rebekah brooks, the chief of the british media holdings. she said it came as a complete surprise
serious by the moment. when you get the superintendent of scotland yard resigning, the prime minister of great britain going to the well to just basically defend himself and his contacts with him, which were more than any other institution or individual and the country, this is a serious, serious story and reality. >> charles? >> the murdochs were on the defensive and had a lot to defend. i thought their presentation was rather good. i think murdoch -- he runs a company that is unbelievably diverse, and this one paper is a relatively small part of it. i am not surprised, and it is plausible that the committee had a sort of accepted his protestations that he was not aware of all of these shenanigans. what i found really interesting, however, was the way the committee conducted itself. hear, when you have hearings, like the polley north hearings, the inquisitors are on a podium looking down on the defendant there, it was like a british parliament cafeteria meeting. a lot more pointed, less pompous, more effective. >> good review. last word. see you next week. for a transcript of this br
that is to get the justice department to investigate. scotland yard is under investigation of several thousand names and phone numbers. i'm sure we could be talking to scotland yard and find out whether americans were part of that. >> politicians in the uk have been chastised to are their recent or i guess their past fears of rupert murdoch and not doing anything against the media baron in having so much control. do you think there would be more politicians having come forward to join you in the investigation or at least the intent of an investigation to find out what could be happening here? >> i would hope certainly those of us who represent the tristate area who lost so many citizens in new jersey, we lost about 00 citizens on that fateful day, so for us this is a question of great moment, this is a question of real concern. we have been working with these families over time. we have been seeking justice along the way, and so when bin laden was killed, there was a measurement of justice, but we've got to make sure that these families have their privacy and the sanctity of those moments for
. there was a bribery scandal. the head of scotland yard is going to resign. i think they are going to try to bring it to the united states. i don't know that anything has been done here. somebody might have hacked into the 9/11 folks. i don't think the wall street journal had anything to do with that. i don't know that any of that went on here and as of right now, it's still in london. a lot of folks want to bring it here. >> what is your opinion on that, ed? >> other than the potential hacking into the 9/11 victims, i'm not sure pat is wrong on this. he may be right. the one thing we don't want it to become, speaking as a democratic progressive. we don't want it to be a witch hunt on murdock. we don't need that. >> right. >> the story is bad enough on its own. >> andrea, let me invite you in on this. we are expecting testimony from murdock and his son tomorrow. that's going to be a circus-like scene. it's unclear who had connection to all of this. >> i think they all have connections. anyone who has lived or worked there knows. peter you spent a lot of time in london, you know the close connectio
of britain's top cop, the man in charge of scotland yard. sir paul stephenson says he did nothing wrong but regrets the criticism that his police failed to do enough. >> however the issue of my integrity is different. let me state clearly, i, and the people who know me, know that my integrity is completely intact. i may wish we had done some things differently, but i will not lose any sleep over my personal integrity. >> let's get the latest now from london and cnn's dan rivers. >> reporter: kyra, another scalp has been claimed by this ever-growing scandal. the most senior policemen in britain, sir paul stephenson, has resigned. meanwhile, the former chief executive of news international, of rupert murdoch's paper, rebecca brooks, was taken in for questioning, detained some 12 hours sunday night and released just after midnight. there was speculation that would have meant that she wouldn't have turned up on tuesday afternoon, london time, to be grilled by politicians. but we're being told by her spokesman that she will be there. she won't appear together with james and rupert murdoch. s
department to go after it, whether he uses the fbi. i mean, scotland yard is already pursuing an investigation of thousands of phones that were intercepted. it seems to me that we should have a very clear ability to be working with scotland yard and determine whether americans were pursued, and whether the families of 9/11 victims were pursued. >> to those who said bob mendez or barbara boxer or frank lautenberg or jay rockefeller, they're all democrats and this is political payback, if you will, against rupert murdoch, what say you? >> i don't have anything against rupert murdoch. if the report was that cnn did this, i would be going after you all. well. >> well, i hope you don't have to do that. dog versus machine. why that was the topic of a fiery debate on exhale clil. -- capitol hill. there's another way litter box dust:e purina tidy cats. tidy cats premium line of litters now works harder on dust. and our improved formulas neutralize odors better than ever in multiple-cat homes. so it's easier to keep your house smelling just the way you want it. purina tidy cats. keep y
. >> absolutely. scotland yard has been embarrassed by the whole situation. scotland yard is taking a very aggressive tactic addressing rebekah brooke. they are getting involve and they not only sounded like they didn't run their newspapers, they sound like they didn't even head their newspapers. anyone who read news of the world or the sun could tell that there were hacked voice mails in there and they had no idea they didn't have the proof. >> give us perspective he was passionate about newspapers. >> sure. this was the best selling newspaper in britain a lot of people and analysts within news corp. said why don't we get rid of the non-money makers and other media venchers. murdoch is an old newspaper man and that's how we came up. he has a sentimental attachment to the papers and when it comes to this side of the atlantic where he keeps the new york post and loses a lot of money and has a lot of influence in new york and nationally, it's because it's part of his power base. that paper and other outlets provide coverage to people who she sympathetic to. not as people who are on the other
tweeting on this issue. he is being called in to scotland yard as part of their investigation to answer some questions. that's because he said that rebecca brooks, he said this in a tweet, rebecca brooks told him almost all the information that appeared in the tabloid was given to them by the police. he went on in a later tweet and talked about the fact that most likely the police are getting quite a bit of money for coming up with these tips. the investigation continues and is widening. in an effort to do something that is exhaustive this time they are checking every angle. george michael falls into that category. >> how are the people of london reacting to this as they see this paper and the details how it was run start to unravel? >> reporter: well, unfortunately, doesn't come as a big surprise for a lot of people here. there is a lot of mistrust. one towards politicians in this country and two towards the media. this for a lot of people just represents what they've known all along, there have been dubious practices. i don't think people here understood the extent to which reporters
paid to scotland yard officers by "news of the world" a violation of federal anti-bribery law. so, there's -- there's multiple fronts on which this is escalating for news corp., on top of the reports today that james murdoch may have to go back before parliament. >> and, mike, is any of this touching the media properties in the united states yet of the rupert murdoch empire, or is all this still stemming from the actions done with the uk media properties? >> well, certainly the computer hacking is an allegation involving a news corp. subsidiary in the united states, so that's the jurisdictional hook there. there's a problem there because it took place seven years ago, outside the statute of limitations, but if there is a pattern of conduct that could be established here, that would be the basis by which the feds could bring charges. but, you know, it's early yet. we got to be cautious. >> all right, mike isikoff, our national investigative correspondent, mike, thanks very much. >> thank you. >>> all right, once every decade, i've been promising you this for days, states redraw the
. the firestorm has also swept through scotland yard where two top police officials have had to resign. jim maceda is live in london, jim, set the stage. >> reporter: hi, chuck. well, you're right. all eyes are now on a very small room, very small room, maybe for 40 or 50, behind me in the building there, parliament building. there are overflow rooms. lots of tv sets. this is must-see tv for the brits today, and i would suspect elsewhere as one british politician said yesterday, these are the three musketeers of the murdoch media empire, and the phone hacking scandal, of course, with it. who will be appearing any minute now. to give you a taste of how electric the atmosphere here has been, just a little while -- about an hour ago, rupert murdoch arrived in a vehicle outside of parliament mobbed by dozens, perhaps hundreds of cameramen and photographers to the point where he couldn't get out of his car. he drove up a eventually came in through a back entrance. now, the murdochs and rebekah brooks will be grilled by ten members of something that doesn't sound very threatening called the select commi
's a reality, isn't it? it's reality, if you look at it. they figured out how to wire scotland yard and parliament and 10 downing street. rupert murdock has been for some time, the most powerful man in britain. >> when you see this frail man yesterday objectly incapable of following the facts, unable to remember the names and certain facts, well, i'm afraid there was something on the part of journalists. they know him to be aggressive, particular, specific. remember, i was mentioning earlier in piers morgan's diaries, he worked for rupert murdock for 18 months and he rang him every week of every month for 18 months. >> martin -- >> yes he says he knew nothing. >> are you surprised more questions haven't been raised about the passage from peer morgan's book where he talks about phone hacking and brags about how you can do it? >> no, i'm not surprised. he doesn't say he does it. what he says in the book, if you read it carefully, this is important. he said, he heard about this phenomena and he therefore personally changed his own cell phone numbers in order to prevent that from happen
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)